• Gregg Braden Surprising New Discoveries

    Gregg Braden recorded December 2015 identifies the keys to thrive in life’s extremes. Drawing upon his expertise in leading-edge science and wisdom traditions of the past, he shares practical strategies for embracing big change in a healthy way. An all-new chapter not included in the original release features up-to-the-minute information about the surprising discovery of brain-like cells—sensory neurites—located within the human heart, and the role they play in creating personal resilience. Gregg uniquely provides the answer, describing: State-of-the-art discoveries that are the key to embracing big change in a healthy way - Why we’re living a ‘new normal’ and the single question that will transform the way you think of your career, - The simple techniques of heart-based resilience th...

    published: 07 Jan 2016
  • Dr Fahad Basheer: "the heart is the center of consciousness"

    The Event Is Coming Soon - Dr. Fahad Basheer: The Heart IS The Center Of Consciousness During organ transplantation there have been numerous reports of emotions, memories and experiences being transferred along with organ which is been transplanted from donor to the recipient. Dr. Pearsall, an American cardiologist, has collected the cases of 73 heart transplant patients and 67 other organ transplant recipients and published them in his book, “The Heart’s Code” Here is a sample of a case that has been reported: Claire Sylvia develops desire for chicken nuggets and green peppers “On May 29, 1988, an American woman named Claire Sylvia received a heart transplant at a hospital in Yale, Connecticut. She was told that her donor was an 18 year-old male from Maine who had just died in a mot...

    published: 13 Apr 2017
  • Gregg Braden Discoveries Embracing Big Change

    Gregg Braden uniquely provides the answer, describing: State-of- the-art discoveries that are the key to embracing big change in a healthy way The three shifts that will transform the way you think of your career, lifestyle, and finances The simple strategies of heart-based resilience that you can learn and use His updated book Resilience From the Heart contains an all-new chapter not included in the original release, featuring material on the surprising discovery of brain-like cells—sensory neurites—located within the human heart, and the role they play in creating personal resilience. A New York Times best-selling author and 2015 Templeton Award nominee, Gregg is internationally renowned as a pioneer in bridging science, spirituality,and the real world.

    published: 01 Oct 2016
  • Dr. Rollin McCraty - Heart-Brain Dynamics - WSIM-2015

    Go to: http://worldsummitintegrativemedicine.com/dr-rollin-mccraty/ Good day, everyone. This is Dr. Rollin McCraty. I am director of research at the HeartMath Institute Research Center, and today I'm going to be talking about how the heart and brain communicate, so the presentation is called: Heart-Brain Dynamics: The Role of Self-regulation and Coherence in Optimal Health and Performance. The human heart has its own complex nervous system, which is technically called the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, and it's been nicknamed the heart-brain. So, this is not said lightly to really say that the heart has a brain, or a little brain in the heart. We mean this quite literally. What you see here is a focal microscopic photo of a small aspect of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system....

    published: 18 Sep 2015
  • Hansa treatment...heart mind connection

    Amazing connection

    published: 10 Jan 2015
  • 12.10 Neurite Outgrowth

    published: 10 Sep 2012
  • Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Therapy can promote the survival of spiral ganglion neurons

    Medicine by Alexandros G. Sfakianakis,Anapafseos 5 Agios Nikolaos 72100 Crete Greece,00302841026182,00306932607174,alsfakia@gmail.com, https://plus.google.com/communities/115462130054650919641?sqinv=VFJWaER0c2NCRl9ERzRjZWhxQmhzY09kVV84cjRn , ,https://plus.google.com/u/0/+AlexandrosGSfakianakis , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQH21WX8Qn5YSTKrlJ3OrmQ , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTREJHxB6yt4Gaqs4-mLzDA , https://twitter.com/g_orl?lang=el, https://www.instagram.com/alexandrossfakianakis/, Can Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Therapy Improve Clinical Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation? Adrien A. Eshraghi, MD, MSc1; Desiree Nguyen, MS1; Rahul Mittal, PhD1 Author Affiliations 1Department of Otolaryngology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida JA...

    published: 20 Apr 2018
  • Techniques For Tapping Into Your Heart Intelligence

    In 1991, a scientific discovery published in the journal Neurocardiology put to rest any lingering doubt that the human heart is more than a pump. The name of the journal gives us a clue to the discovery of a powerful relationship between the heart and the brain that went unrecognized in the past. A team of scientists led by J. Andrew Armour, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Montreal, which was studying this intimate relationship between the two, found that about 40,000 specialized neurons, or sensory neurites, form a communication network within the heart. Follow us on social media TWITTER , INSTAGRAM, FACEBOOK - @soul life network #spiritual #kundalini #enlightenment #awakening #ascension #consciousness #immortality #meditation #yoga #alchemy #psychic #DNA #thirdeye #chakras #anci...

    published: 24 Mar 2018
  • Neurobiology 3. Lec. - Axon Growth and Guidence [4/7]

    Professor Jens Bo Nielsen

    published: 11 Feb 2013
  • Ephrin A, Axon Growth Cones and Retinal Ganglion Cells Part 1

    In this video we discuss how the mechanism by which Ephrin A produces retraction of the Axon growth cone is dependent upon calcium oscillations, which are amplified through phasic oscillations in cyclic AMP.

    published: 01 Nov 2014
  • Long-distance neuronal path-finding

    Long-distance neuronal path-finding Retinal axons travel across the brain, reading navigation cues, to find appropriate targets. HHMI http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/video/

    published: 01 Jun 2010
  • Neuron ANATOMY and Function simplified Video

    Neuron Structure and Function simplified LIKE US ON FACEBOOK : fb.me/Medsimplified BUY USING AFFILIATE LINKS : AMAZON US--- https://goo.gl/XSJtTx AMAZON India http://goo.gl/QsUhku FLIPKART http://fkrt.it/Wiv8RNNNNN FLIPKART MOBILE APP http://fkrt.it/Wiv8RNNNNN A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information through electrical and chemical signals. These signals between neurons occur via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons can connect to each other to form neural networks. Neurons are the core components of the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system (CNS), and of the ganglia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Specialized types of neurons include: sensory neurons which respond to touch, sound, light and all ...

    published: 21 Apr 2016
  • The Invention and Development of Diffusion Tensor NMR and MRI at the NIH - Peter Basser

    Talk presented at a two day conference at Cardiff University entitled ‘A spin thro’ the history of restricted diffusion MR’ on January 31st and February 1st 2017. The conference was hosted by the Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre and was sponsored by Siemens Healthineers and the EPSRC.

    published: 05 May 2017
  • PrP induces neurite growth and cone growth turning

    Low concentrations of prion protein stimulate and guide neurite growth

    published: 17 Oct 2016
  • What is NEURAL DARWINISM? What does NEURAL DARWINISM mean? NEURAL DARWINISM meaning & explanation

    What is NEURAL DARWINISM? What does NEURAL DARWINISM mean? NEURAL DARWINISM meaning - NEURAL DARWINISM definition - NEURAL DARWINISM explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Neural Darwinism, a large scale theory of brain function by Gerald Edelman, was initially published in 1978, in a book called The Mindful Brain (MIT Press). It was extended and published in the 1987 book Neural Darwinism – The Theory of Neuronal Group Selection. In 1972, Edelman was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (shared with Rodney Porter of Great Britain) for his work in immunology showing how the population of lympho...

    published: 21 Jun 2017
  • Retrograde extension of a single sensory dendrite

    See paper by Heiman et al. Cell. 2009 Apr 17;137(2):344-55. Epub 2009 Apr 2. http://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674%2809%2900159-7 Neuronal axons are known to form by growing out from a stationary cell body. Dendrites, in contrast, are now seen to form when a short directed migration of the cell body drags out a neurite that is anchored in place. Formation of the sensory dendrite (in red) as shown here, in a living C. elegans embryo depends on the tectorin-like DEX-1 and DYF-7 anchoring proteins.

    published: 27 May 2009
  • Neuron

    A neuron (/ˈnjʊərɒn/ NYEWR-on or /ˈnʊərɒn/ NEWR-on; also known as a neurone or nerve cell) is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information through electrical and chemical signals. These signals between neurons occur via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons can connect to each other to form neural networks. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord and the ganglia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) which comprises the central nervous system (CNS). Specialized types of neurons include: sensory neurons which respond to touch, sound, light and all other stimuli affecting the cells of the sensory organs, that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons that receive signals ...

    published: 15 Jul 2014
  • Measuring forces associated with axon growth

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) was used to assess forces associated with axon advance. Green encodes the amount of work being done by the growth cone on the underlying substrate. The arrow is a vector sum of the net tension the growth cone is applying to the neurite shaft.

    published: 11 Mar 2015
  • growth cone

    Rat E15 sensory (DRG) neuron growth cone. Time lapse; 1 frame every 5 seconds (150X). Neurons cultured on poly-d-lysine/laminin substrate on glass coverslip. Images collected using DIC optics on a Zeiss inverted microscope with a 63X objective (sorry - it has been a while, so I can't provide the exact optics). Organelle movement is visible in the growth cone. Additionally, organelle traffic is visible along the axon that crosses the field of view from the top to (bottom) right edge of the frame. Collected as part of my graduate work in Tom Jessel's lab in 1989. Scale bar is 10 uM.

    published: 12 Nov 2014
  • Emotion

    Your Heart is intelligent! read more: http://scmontenegro.com/index.php/articles/17-emotion/43-your-heart-knows

    published: 02 Jan 2017
  • Sensory growth cone encountering an interjecting motor axon.

    This encounter leads to reorientation of the sensory axon trajectory, and tracking of the sensory growth cone along the length of the motor axon shaft. Sensory growth cone (DiI: red), interjecting motor axon (GFP: green). Note: tracking is typically accompanied by numerous transient sensory growth cone filopodial-motor axon membrane contacts. Full protocol described in: Liang Wang & Till Marquardt. Direct live monitoring of heterotypic axon-axon interactions in vitro Nature Protocols 7, 351--363 (2012) doi:10.1038/nprot.2011.442 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2011.442

    published: 27 Jan 2012
  • Axon Guidance on a wheel pattern of laminin

    Check out this cool axon guidance experiment done with PRIMO by Hugo Ducuing, Rachel Moore, Pierre-Olivier Strale, Yohan Lecomte and Vincent Studer, at the Cajal summer school in Bordeaux Neuro Campus: Chicken brain explant on a wheel pattern of laminin (patterned with PRIMO) - Axon guidance on the spokes and around the circumference of the laminin wheel pattern. www.alveolelab.com

    published: 19 Aug 2016
  • Connecting the Connectoms - Derek Jones

    Talk presented at a two day conference at Cardiff University entitled ‘A spin thro’ the history of restricted diffusion MR’ on January 31st and February 1st 2017. The conference was hosted by the Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre and was sponsored by Siemens Healthineers and the EPSRC.

    published: 05 May 2017
  • What is UNIPOLAR NEURON? What does UNIPOLAR NEURON mean? UNIPOLAR NEURON meaning & explanation

    What is UNIPOLAR NEURON? What does UNIPOLAR NEURON mean? UNIPOLAR NEURON meaning - UNIPOLAR NEURON definition - UNIPOLAR NEURON explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A unipolar neuron is a type of neuron in which only one protoplasmic process (neurite) extends from the cell body. Most neurons are multipolar, generating several dendrites and an axon and there are also many bipolar neurons. Unipolar neurons that begin as bipolar neurons during development are known as pseudounipolar neurons. Unipolar neurons are common in insects, where the cell body is often located at the periphery of the brain and is elect...

    published: 18 Aug 2017
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Gregg Braden Surprising New Discoveries
53:10

Gregg Braden Surprising New Discoveries

  • Order:
  • Duration: 53:10
  • Updated: 07 Jan 2016
  • views: 94865
videos
Gregg Braden recorded December 2015 identifies the keys to thrive in life’s extremes. Drawing upon his expertise in leading-edge science and wisdom traditions of the past, he shares practical strategies for embracing big change in a healthy way. An all-new chapter not included in the original release features up-to-the-minute information about the surprising discovery of brain-like cells—sensory neurites—located within the human heart, and the role they play in creating personal resilience. Gregg uniquely provides the answer, describing: State-of-the-art discoveries that are the key to embracing big change in a healthy way - Why we’re living a ‘new normal’ and the single question that will transform the way you think of your career, - The simple techniques of heart-based resilience that you can learn and use immediately for optimal health in our Thanks to Cliff Dunning http://www.earthancients.com/ https://twitter.com/cliffdunning https://www.facebook.com/Earth-Ancients-208845839237411/
https://wn.com/Gregg_Braden_Surprising_New_Discoveries
Dr  Fahad Basheer:  "the heart is the center of consciousness"
9:31

Dr Fahad Basheer: "the heart is the center of consciousness"

  • Order:
  • Duration: 9:31
  • Updated: 13 Apr 2017
  • views: 542
videos
The Event Is Coming Soon - Dr. Fahad Basheer: The Heart IS The Center Of Consciousness During organ transplantation there have been numerous reports of emotions, memories and experiences being transferred along with organ which is been transplanted from donor to the recipient. Dr. Pearsall, an American cardiologist, has collected the cases of 73 heart transplant patients and 67 other organ transplant recipients and published them in his book, “The Heart’s Code” Here is a sample of a case that has been reported: Claire Sylvia develops desire for chicken nuggets and green peppers “On May 29, 1988, an American woman named Claire Sylvia received a heart transplant at a hospital in Yale, Connecticut. She was told that her donor was an 18 year-old male from Maine who had just died in a motorcycle accident. “Soon after her operation, Sylvia declared that she felt like drinking beer Source: http://dreamcatcherreality.com/heart-center-consciousness/ ------------------------------------------------------- $1 Donation to PayPal: Send paypal donations to this paypal email address using you paypal account. eventiscomingsoon@gmail.com ------------------------------------------------------- Visit our sister channel EVENT IS COMING SOON https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJcmcStuyZVEkQheqINZjBA Please enter our Subscriber Appreciation Monthly Giveaway - Enter Here: http://theeventiscomingsoon.com/our-youtube-cash-giveaway Please visit our Playlist for additional intel: The Event Intel https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZX49q1VM8O0p0XzU10aCLsSS92iTVQeg Disclosure https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZX49q1VM8O0C40VKZcQt-GRdpRaUy4lh Politics https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZX49q1VM8O0wTVaYupBh1Rq17yto_52t Newest Videos https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLZX49q1VM8O0c5ifCAZSE3J0pRR9BcgUI The Event Is Coming Soon https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNdcqCdkJ-EFv0IEU79MDUA https://youtu.be/9FhZGPAeyrk SUPPORT US USING OUR LINKS! ----------------------------------------------------- http://theeventiscomingsoon.com http://twitter.com/eventcomingsoon Copyright Disclaimer: Citation of articles and authors in this report does not imply ownership. Works and images presented here fall under Fair Use Section 107 and are used for commentary on globally significant newsworthy events. Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. ----------------------------------------------------------- MAKE DONATIONS HERE http://theeventiscomingsoon.com/donation -----------------------------------------------------------
https://wn.com/Dr_Fahad_Basheer_The_Heart_Is_The_Center_Of_Consciousness
Gregg Braden Discoveries Embracing Big Change
32:36

Gregg Braden Discoveries Embracing Big Change

  • Order:
  • Duration: 32:36
  • Updated: 01 Oct 2016
  • views: 6262
videos
Gregg Braden uniquely provides the answer, describing: State-of- the-art discoveries that are the key to embracing big change in a healthy way The three shifts that will transform the way you think of your career, lifestyle, and finances The simple strategies of heart-based resilience that you can learn and use His updated book Resilience From the Heart contains an all-new chapter not included in the original release, featuring material on the surprising discovery of brain-like cells—sensory neurites—located within the human heart, and the role they play in creating personal resilience. A New York Times best-selling author and 2015 Templeton Award nominee, Gregg is internationally renowned as a pioneer in bridging science, spirituality,and the real world.
https://wn.com/Gregg_Braden_Discoveries_Embracing_Big_Change
Dr. Rollin McCraty - Heart-Brain Dynamics - WSIM-2015
1:41

Dr. Rollin McCraty - Heart-Brain Dynamics - WSIM-2015

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:41
  • Updated: 18 Sep 2015
  • views: 621
videos
Go to: http://worldsummitintegrativemedicine.com/dr-rollin-mccraty/ Good day, everyone. This is Dr. Rollin McCraty. I am director of research at the HeartMath Institute Research Center, and today I'm going to be talking about how the heart and brain communicate, so the presentation is called: Heart-Brain Dynamics: The Role of Self-regulation and Coherence in Optimal Health and Performance. The human heart has its own complex nervous system, which is technically called the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, and it's been nicknamed the heart-brain. So, this is not said lightly to really say that the heart has a brain, or a little brain in the heart. We mean this quite literally. What you see here is a focal microscopic photo of a small aspect of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system. We know that they have short-term memory, long-term memory, neuroplasticity, neurogenesis - all the same types of things you would expect from a functional brain. What we found when we measure, using single-avenue processes, a mom's brainwaves and her baby's heartbeats (we're actually measuring both ways), what was really interesting was mom's brainwaves literally synchronized to her baby's heartbeats. I should add here that this is an energetic experiment - there's no physical contact. World Summit of Integrative Medicine 2015 WSIM2015.com Sponsored by Quantum University QuantumUniversity.com
https://wn.com/Dr._Rollin_Mccraty_Heart_Brain_Dynamics_Wsim_2015
Hansa treatment...heart mind connection
3:24

Hansa treatment...heart mind connection

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:24
  • Updated: 10 Jan 2015
  • views: 51
videos
Amazing connection
https://wn.com/Hansa_Treatment...Heart_Mind_Connection
12.10 Neurite Outgrowth
0:47

12.10 Neurite Outgrowth

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:47
  • Updated: 10 Sep 2012
  • views: 3740
videos
https://wn.com/12.10_Neurite_Outgrowth
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Therapy can promote the survival of spiral ganglion neurons
3:01

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Therapy can promote the survival of spiral ganglion neurons

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:01
  • Updated: 20 Apr 2018
  • views: 0
videos
Medicine by Alexandros G. Sfakianakis,Anapafseos 5 Agios Nikolaos 72100 Crete Greece,00302841026182,00306932607174,alsfakia@gmail.com, https://plus.google.com/communities/115462130054650919641?sqinv=VFJWaER0c2NCRl9ERzRjZWhxQmhzY09kVV84cjRn , ,https://plus.google.com/u/0/+AlexandrosGSfakianakis , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQH21WX8Qn5YSTKrlJ3OrmQ , https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTREJHxB6yt4Gaqs4-mLzDA , https://twitter.com/g_orl?lang=el, https://www.instagram.com/alexandrossfakianakis/, Can Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Therapy Improve Clinical Outcomes of Cochlear Implantation? Adrien A. Eshraghi, MD, MSc1; Desiree Nguyen, MS1; Rahul Mittal, PhD1 Author Affiliations 1Department of Otolaryngology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2018;144(4):287-288. doi:10.1001/jamaoto.2017.3414 Full Text The cochlear implant (CI) is currently the standard rehabilitation strategy for individuals who have severe to profound hearing loss (HL) because elements of the inner ear and neurons are not able to regenerate spontaneously.1 The CI electrode array is inserted surgically in the scala tympani of the cochlea. Sound received by the device is then converted to electrical signals, which stimulates the remaining auditory neurons, thus circumventing the malfunctioning or absent mechanosensory cells.1 Therefore, the quality and condition of these residual neuronal structures are key factors in determining the long-term CI outcomes. Unfortunately, insertion of electrode array mounts host inflammatory responses, which may lead to apoptosis of sensory cells as well as auditory neurons and, consequently, loss of residual hearing. Owing to the risk of unfavorable consequences of CI on the sensory cells and the neurons, there is a need to develop strategies to prevent damage and boost the survival of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Recent animal studies2 have shown that administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has the potential to improve CI outcomes. This can be attributed to the ability of BDNF to protect and prevent the CI-associated degeneration of auditory neurons, particularly SGNs. In addition, a neural gap exists between the CI and the SGN somata that can influence CI outcome.2 Closing the neural gap between CI and the target sensory neurons offers the opportunity to surmount current biophysical limitations of SGN recruitment. As BDNF promotes regeneration of the peripheral dendrites of auditory neurons, including SGN neurites,3 it holds a great potential to close this neural gap by bringing the extended neurites close to the CI electrode array, thereby allowing more specific neural activation at lower thresholds. Furthermore, BDNF can promote the survival of SGN neurites for longer time periods that can be instrumental in improving CI outcomes.
https://wn.com/Brain_Derived_Neurotrophic_Factor_Therapy_Can_Promote_The_Survival_Of_Spiral_Ganglion_Neurons
Techniques For Tapping Into Your Heart Intelligence
11:49

Techniques For Tapping Into Your Heart Intelligence

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:49
  • Updated: 24 Mar 2018
  • views: 1
videos
In 1991, a scientific discovery published in the journal Neurocardiology put to rest any lingering doubt that the human heart is more than a pump. The name of the journal gives us a clue to the discovery of a powerful relationship between the heart and the brain that went unrecognized in the past. A team of scientists led by J. Andrew Armour, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Montreal, which was studying this intimate relationship between the two, found that about 40,000 specialized neurons, or sensory neurites, form a communication network within the heart. Follow us on social media TWITTER , INSTAGRAM, FACEBOOK - @soul life network #spiritual #kundalini #enlightenment #awakening #ascension #consciousness #immortality #meditation #yoga #alchemy #psychic #DNA #thirdeye #chakras #ancientarts #tantra #hathayoga #soullifenetwork #kundaliniyoga #illuminati #wisdom #esoteric #occult #lightworker #oneness #selfmastery #soul #taoism #mysticism #philosophy #metaphysics Tags soul life network,spiritual,kundalini yoga,kundalini,consciousness,enlightenment,esoteric,occult,awakening,ascension,meditation,yoga,alchemy,psychic,hatha yoga,illuminati,lightworker,oneness,self mastery,soul,taoism,mysticism,metaphysics,The Brain in Your Chest Science Backed Techniques For Tapping Into Your Heart Intelligence,how to tap into heart intelligence,how to understand your true passion,understanding yourself,how to find passion,how to know your passion in life
https://wn.com/Techniques_For_Tapping_Into_Your_Heart_Intelligence
Neurobiology 3. Lec. - Axon Growth and Guidence [4/7]
12:01

Neurobiology 3. Lec. - Axon Growth and Guidence [4/7]

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:01
  • Updated: 11 Feb 2013
  • views: 1984
videos
Professor Jens Bo Nielsen
https://wn.com/Neurobiology_3._Lec._Axon_Growth_And_Guidence_4_7
Ephrin A, Axon Growth Cones and Retinal Ganglion Cells Part 1
11:57

Ephrin A, Axon Growth Cones and Retinal Ganglion Cells Part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 11:57
  • Updated: 01 Nov 2014
  • views: 3101
videos
In this video we discuss how the mechanism by which Ephrin A produces retraction of the Axon growth cone is dependent upon calcium oscillations, which are amplified through phasic oscillations in cyclic AMP.
https://wn.com/Ephrin_A,_Axon_Growth_Cones_And_Retinal_Ganglion_Cells_Part_1
Long-distance neuronal path-finding
0:31

Long-distance neuronal path-finding

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:31
  • Updated: 01 Jun 2010
  • views: 2988
videos
Long-distance neuronal path-finding Retinal axons travel across the brain, reading navigation cues, to find appropriate targets. HHMI http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/video/
https://wn.com/Long_Distance_Neuronal_Path_Finding
Neuron ANATOMY and Function simplified Video
4:26

Neuron ANATOMY and Function simplified Video

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:26
  • Updated: 21 Apr 2016
  • views: 29838
videos
Neuron Structure and Function simplified LIKE US ON FACEBOOK : fb.me/Medsimplified BUY USING AFFILIATE LINKS : AMAZON US--- https://goo.gl/XSJtTx AMAZON India http://goo.gl/QsUhku FLIPKART http://fkrt.it/Wiv8RNNNNN FLIPKART MOBILE APP http://fkrt.it/Wiv8RNNNNN A neuron is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information through electrical and chemical signals. These signals between neurons occur via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons can connect to each other to form neural networks. Neurons are the core components of the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system (CNS), and of the ganglia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Specialized types of neurons include: sensory neurons which respond to touch, sound, light and all other stimuli affecting the cells of the sensory organs that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain, motor neurons that receive signals from the brain and spinal cord to cause muscle contractions and affect glandular outputs, and interneurons which connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain, or spinal cord in neural networks. A typical neuron consists of a cell body (soma), dendrites, and an axon. The term neurite is used to describe either a dendrite or an axon, particularly in its undifferentiated stage. Dendrites are thin structures that arise from the cell body, often extending for hundreds of micrometres and branching multiple times, giving rise to a complex "dendritic tree". An axon (also called a nerve fiber when myelinated) is a special cellular extension (process) that arises from the cell body at a site called the axon hillock and travels for a distance, as far as 1 meter in humans or even more in other species. Nerve fibers are often bundled into fascicles, and in the peripheral nervous system, bundles of fascicles make up nerves (like strands of wire make up cables). The cell body of a neuron frequently gives rise to multiple dendrites, but never to more than one axon, although the axon may branch hundreds of times before it terminates. At the majority of synapses, signals are sent from the axon of one neuron to a dendrite of another. There are, however, many exceptions to these rules: neurons that lack dendrites, neurons that have no axon, synapses that connect an axon to another axon or a dendrite to another dendrite, etc. All neurons are electrically excitable, maintaining voltage gradients across their membranes by means of metabolically driven ion pumps, which combine with ion channels embedded in the membrane to generate intracellular-versus-extracellular concentration differences of ions such as sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium. Changes in the cross-membrane voltage can alter the function of voltage-dependent ion channels. If the voltage changes by a large enough amount, an all-or-none electrochemical pulse called an action potential is generated, which travels rapidly along the cell's axon, and activates synaptic connections with other cells when it arrives. In most cases, neurons are generated by special types of stem cells. It is generally believed that neurons do not undergo cell division but recent research in dogs shows that in some instances in the retina they do.[1] Astrocytes are star-shaped glial cells that have also been observed to turn into neurons by virtue of the stem cell characteristic pluripotency. In humans, neurogenesis largely ceases during adulthood; but in two brain areas, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb, there is strong evidence for generation of substantial numbers of new neurons. Watch Again https://youtu.be/R_l7glsLXC0 Subscribe https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOmrniWfKi-uCD6Oh6fqhgw -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- CHECK OUT NEWEST VIDEO: "Nucleic acids - DNA and RNA structure " https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lZRAShqft0 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
https://wn.com/Neuron_Anatomy_And_Function_Simplified_Video
The Invention and Development of Diffusion Tensor NMR and MRI at the NIH - Peter Basser
40:15

The Invention and Development of Diffusion Tensor NMR and MRI at the NIH - Peter Basser

  • Order:
  • Duration: 40:15
  • Updated: 05 May 2017
  • views: 250
videos
Talk presented at a two day conference at Cardiff University entitled ‘A spin thro’ the history of restricted diffusion MR’ on January 31st and February 1st 2017. The conference was hosted by the Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre and was sponsored by Siemens Healthineers and the EPSRC.
https://wn.com/The_Invention_And_Development_Of_Diffusion_Tensor_Nmr_And_Mri_At_The_Nih_Peter_Basser
PrP induces neurite growth and cone growth turning
0:38

PrP induces neurite growth and cone growth turning

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  • Duration: 0:38
  • Updated: 17 Oct 2016
  • views: 252
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Low concentrations of prion protein stimulate and guide neurite growth
https://wn.com/Prp_Induces_Neurite_Growth_And_Cone_Growth_Turning
What is NEURAL DARWINISM? What does NEURAL DARWINISM mean? NEURAL DARWINISM meaning & explanation
7:02

What is NEURAL DARWINISM? What does NEURAL DARWINISM mean? NEURAL DARWINISM meaning & explanation

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  • Duration: 7:02
  • Updated: 21 Jun 2017
  • views: 329
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What is NEURAL DARWINISM? What does NEURAL DARWINISM mean? NEURAL DARWINISM meaning - NEURAL DARWINISM definition - NEURAL DARWINISM explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Neural Darwinism, a large scale theory of brain function by Gerald Edelman, was initially published in 1978, in a book called The Mindful Brain (MIT Press). It was extended and published in the 1987 book Neural Darwinism – The Theory of Neuronal Group Selection. In 1972, Edelman was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (shared with Rodney Porter of Great Britain) for his work in immunology showing how the population of lymphocytes capable of binding to a foreign antigen is increased by differential clonal multiplication following antigen discovery. Essentially, this proved that the human body is capable of creating complex adaptive systems as a result of local events with feedback. Edelman's interest in selective systems expanded into the fields of neurobiology and neurophysiology, and in Neural Darwinism, Edelman puts forth a theory called "neuronal group selection". It contains three major parts: Anatomical connectivity in the brain occurs via selective mechanochemical events that take place epigenetically during development. This creates a diverse primary repertoire by differential reproduction. Once structural diversity is established anatomically, a second selective process occurs during postnatal behavioral experience through epigenetic modifications in the strength of synaptic connections between neuronal groups. This creates a diverse secondary repertoire by differential amplification. Reentrant signaling between neuronal groups allows for spatiotemporal continuity in response to real-world interactions. In "The Remembered Present" (1989) and later, "Bright Air, Brilliant Fire: On the Matter of the Mind" (1992) and "A Universe of Consciousness: How Matter Becomes Imagination" (2001; coauthored with Giulio Tononi), Edelman argues that thalamocortical and corticocortical reentrant signaling are critical to generating and maintaining conscious states in mammals. With neuronal heterogeneity (by Edelman called degeneracy), it is possible to test the many circuits (on the order of 30 billion neurons with an estimated one quadrillion connections between them in the human brain) with a diverse set of inputs, to see which neuronal groups respond "appropriately" statistically. Functional "distributed" (widespread) brain circuits thus emerge as a result. Edelman goes into some detail about how brain development depends on a variety of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and substrate adhesion molecules (SAMs) on cell surfaces which allow cells to dynamically control their intercellular binding properties. This surface modulation allows cell collectives to effectively "signal" as the group aggregates, which helps govern morphogenesis. So morphology depends on CAM and SAM function. And CAM and SAM function also depend on developing morphology. Edelman theorized that cell proliferation, cell migration, cell death, neuron arbor distribution, and neurite branching are also governed by similar selective processes. Once the basic variegated anatomical structure of the brain is laid down during early development, it is more or less fixed. But given the numerous and diverse collection of available circuitry, there are bound to be functionally equivalent albeit anatomically non-isomorphic neuronal groups capable of responding to certain sensory input.....
https://wn.com/What_Is_Neural_Darwinism_What_Does_Neural_Darwinism_Mean_Neural_Darwinism_Meaning_Explanation
Retrograde extension of a single sensory dendrite
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Retrograde extension of a single sensory dendrite

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  • Updated: 27 May 2009
  • views: 912
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See paper by Heiman et al. Cell. 2009 Apr 17;137(2):344-55. Epub 2009 Apr 2. http://www.cell.com/abstract/S0092-8674%2809%2900159-7 Neuronal axons are known to form by growing out from a stationary cell body. Dendrites, in contrast, are now seen to form when a short directed migration of the cell body drags out a neurite that is anchored in place. Formation of the sensory dendrite (in red) as shown here, in a living C. elegans embryo depends on the tectorin-like DEX-1 and DYF-7 anchoring proteins.
https://wn.com/Retrograde_Extension_Of_A_Single_Sensory_Dendrite
Neuron
40:23

Neuron

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  • Duration: 40:23
  • Updated: 15 Jul 2014
  • views: 343
videos
A neuron (/ˈnjʊərɒn/ NYEWR-on or /ˈnʊərɒn/ NEWR-on; also known as a neurone or nerve cell) is an electrically excitable cell that processes and transmits information through electrical and chemical signals. These signals between neurons occur via synapses, specialized connections with other cells. Neurons can connect to each other to form neural networks. Neurons are the core components of the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord and the ganglia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) which comprises the central nervous system (CNS). Specialized types of neurons include: sensory neurons which respond to touch, sound, light and all other stimuli affecting the cells of the sensory organs, that then send signals to the spinal cord and brain; motor neurons that receive signals from the brain and spinal cord, to cause muscle contractions, and affect glandular outputs, and interneurons which connect neurons to other neurons within the same region of the brain or spinal cord, in neural networks. A typical neuron possesses a cell body (soma), dendrites, and an axon. The term neurite is used to describe either a dendrite or an axon, particularly in its undifferentiated stage. Dendrites are thin structures that arise from the cell body, often extending for hundreds of micrometres and branching multiple times, giving rise to a complex "dendritic tree". An axon is a special cellular extension that arises from the cell body at a site called the axon hillock and travels for a distance, as far as 1 meter in humans or even more in other species. The cell body of a neuron frequently gives rise to multiple dendrites, but never to more than one axon, although the axon may branch hundreds of times before it terminates. At the majority of synapses, signals are sent from the axon of one neuron to a dendrite of another. There are, however, many exceptions to these rules: neurons that lack dendrites, neurons that have no axon, synapses that connect an axon to another axon or a dendrite to another dendrite, etc. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
https://wn.com/Neuron
Measuring forces associated with axon growth
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Measuring forces associated with axon growth

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  • Updated: 11 Mar 2015
  • views: 180
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Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) was used to assess forces associated with axon advance. Green encodes the amount of work being done by the growth cone on the underlying substrate. The arrow is a vector sum of the net tension the growth cone is applying to the neurite shaft.
https://wn.com/Measuring_Forces_Associated_With_Axon_Growth
growth cone
0:29

growth cone

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  • Updated: 12 Nov 2014
  • views: 8753
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Rat E15 sensory (DRG) neuron growth cone. Time lapse; 1 frame every 5 seconds (150X). Neurons cultured on poly-d-lysine/laminin substrate on glass coverslip. Images collected using DIC optics on a Zeiss inverted microscope with a 63X objective (sorry - it has been a while, so I can't provide the exact optics). Organelle movement is visible in the growth cone. Additionally, organelle traffic is visible along the axon that crosses the field of view from the top to (bottom) right edge of the frame. Collected as part of my graduate work in Tom Jessel's lab in 1989. Scale bar is 10 uM.
https://wn.com/Growth_Cone
Emotion
0:43

Emotion

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  • Duration: 0:43
  • Updated: 02 Jan 2017
  • views: 35
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Your Heart is intelligent! read more: http://scmontenegro.com/index.php/articles/17-emotion/43-your-heart-knows
https://wn.com/Emotion
Sensory growth cone encountering an interjecting motor axon.
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Sensory growth cone encountering an interjecting motor axon.

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  • Updated: 27 Jan 2012
  • views: 3476
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This encounter leads to reorientation of the sensory axon trajectory, and tracking of the sensory growth cone along the length of the motor axon shaft. Sensory growth cone (DiI: red), interjecting motor axon (GFP: green). Note: tracking is typically accompanied by numerous transient sensory growth cone filopodial-motor axon membrane contacts. Full protocol described in: Liang Wang & Till Marquardt. Direct live monitoring of heterotypic axon-axon interactions in vitro Nature Protocols 7, 351--363 (2012) doi:10.1038/nprot.2011.442 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2011.442
https://wn.com/Sensory_Growth_Cone_Encountering_An_Interjecting_Motor_Axon.
Axon Guidance on a wheel pattern of laminin
0:15

Axon Guidance on a wheel pattern of laminin

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  • Duration: 0:15
  • Updated: 19 Aug 2016
  • views: 434
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Check out this cool axon guidance experiment done with PRIMO by Hugo Ducuing, Rachel Moore, Pierre-Olivier Strale, Yohan Lecomte and Vincent Studer, at the Cajal summer school in Bordeaux Neuro Campus: Chicken brain explant on a wheel pattern of laminin (patterned with PRIMO) - Axon guidance on the spokes and around the circumference of the laminin wheel pattern. www.alveolelab.com
https://wn.com/Axon_Guidance_On_A_Wheel_Pattern_Of_Laminin
Connecting the Connectoms - Derek Jones
15:17

Connecting the Connectoms - Derek Jones

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  • Duration: 15:17
  • Updated: 05 May 2017
  • views: 478
videos
Talk presented at a two day conference at Cardiff University entitled ‘A spin thro’ the history of restricted diffusion MR’ on January 31st and February 1st 2017. The conference was hosted by the Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre and was sponsored by Siemens Healthineers and the EPSRC.
https://wn.com/Connecting_The_Connectoms_Derek_Jones
What is UNIPOLAR NEURON? What does UNIPOLAR NEURON mean? UNIPOLAR NEURON meaning & explanation
1:42

What is UNIPOLAR NEURON? What does UNIPOLAR NEURON mean? UNIPOLAR NEURON meaning & explanation

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  • Duration: 1:42
  • Updated: 18 Aug 2017
  • views: 364
videos
What is UNIPOLAR NEURON? What does UNIPOLAR NEURON mean? UNIPOLAR NEURON meaning - UNIPOLAR NEURON definition - UNIPOLAR NEURON explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ A unipolar neuron is a type of neuron in which only one protoplasmic process (neurite) extends from the cell body. Most neurons are multipolar, generating several dendrites and an axon and there are also many bipolar neurons. Unipolar neurons that begin as bipolar neurons during development are known as pseudounipolar neurons. Unipolar neurons are common in insects, where the cell body is often located at the periphery of the brain and is electrically inactive. These cell bodies often send a single neurite into the brain; however, this neurite may ramify into a large number of branches making a very complex set of connections with other neurites, in regions of neuropil. Unipolar brush cells are neurons specific to the cerebellum and the granule region of the dorsal cochlear nucleus. In all species, including vertebrates and invertebrates, many types of primary sensory neurons are pseudounipolar. Typically these have special structures for transducing some type of physical stimulus (light, sound, temperature, etc.) into electrical activity, no dendrites, and a single axon that conveys the resulting signals into the spinal cord or brain.
https://wn.com/What_Is_Unipolar_Neuron_What_Does_Unipolar_Neuron_Mean_Unipolar_Neuron_Meaning_Explanation